New Israeli Voices – Talking Points

Talking Points for New Israeli Voices in Dance

March 19-21, 2015

Lincoln Hall, Portland State University

Works by Danielle Agami and Hillel Kogan

  • Both Agami and Kogan have ties to internationally renowned Batsheva Dance Company, based in Israel.
  • Agami and her company, Ate9, relocated to Los Angeles from Seattle.
  • Her work, EXHIBIT B, is a world premiere, commissioned by White Bird.
  • Previous work has embraced highly physical and unpredictable movement with a manic sense of humor. Vancouver’s entertainment publication Georgia Straight called her piece mouth to mouth, “detailed”, “edgy”, and that it captured “the rapture and the rush of life.”
  • She herself danced with Batsheva from 2002-2010, serving as rehearsal director for two of those years.
  • Agami is also an instructor of Gaga technique, created by Ohad Naharin founder of Batsheva. Teaching has taken her across the United States, from New York, Boston, and Seattle.
  • Gaga technique is popular for its basis in improvisational movement guided by imagery, and emphasis on sensuality and pleasure.
  • In Portland her work has recently been shown at Northwest Dance Project and at Conduit Dance
  • In addition to independent choreography projects, Kogan also serves as rehearsal director for Batsheva Dance Company.
  • Kogan’s dance theater work We Love Arabs, combines spoken text with intense physicality, laced with humor and emotion. It premiered in Tel Aviv in 2013.
  • The piece touches on themes of Jewish and Arab religious identities and cultural differences and prejudices. The Jerusalem Post’s Ora Brafman called this work, “witty, provocative, political and hilarious”.  It was also performed in New York City, of which Culturadar.com said the piece “uses everything from humor to hummus to address the anxiety, fear and prejudice fostered by decades of conflict.”
  • Each performance will be followed by an interactive conversation with choreographers Kogan, Agami and their company members focused on the poignant and culturally relevant issues raised by their work.